TIME Magazine Person of the Year 2010?

WikiLeaks founder Assange holds news conference at the Geneva Press Club in Geneva

 

REUTERS/Valentin Flauraud

The man behind WikiLeaks has won the most votes in this year’s Person of the Year poll.

Readers voted a total of 1,249,425 times, and the favorite was clear. Julian Assange raked in 382,020 votes, giving him an easy first place. He was 148,383 votes over the silver medalist, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, Prime Minister of Turkey.

(See the top 10 everything of 2010.)

But Assange wasn’t the winner in all aspects — Lady Gaga trounced him on Facebook, receiving 65,417 “likes” on Facebook to Assange’s 45,643. See the top 10 readers’ choices below, and view the full poll here.

  1. Julian Assange
  2. Recep Tayyip Erdogan
  3. Lady Gaga
  4. Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert
  5. Glenn Beck
  6. Barack Obama
  7. Steve Jobs
  8. The Chilean Miners
  9. The Unemployed American
  10. Mark Zuckerberg

(See TIME’s exclusive interview with Julian Assange.)

Will Assange be named Person of the Year? The editors of TIME will unveil their choice on the TODAY show, Wednesday morning on NBC.

Read more: http://newsfeed.time.com/2010/12/13/julian-assange-readers-choice-for-times-person-of-the-year-2010/#ixzz187lWMoX0

Advertisements

Wikileaks “The Peoples” TSA

 

There was a time when WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange’s voluntary surrender to the British authorities might have put an end to the crisis created by the Internet provocateur’s dissemination of tens of thousands of state secrets. But in the upside-down world of transnational crowdsourcing unleashed by WikiLeaks, in which thousands of activists around the globe can be rallied to defend and extend its work, Assange’s arrest is a win, not a loss, for his organization.

The asymmetrical info war initiated by the WikiLeaks dump of diplomatic cables is all about spectacle — the more Assange is set up by world powers, the more powerful his own movement becomes. “The field of battle is WikiLeaks,” wrote John Perry Barlow, a former Grateful Dead lyricist and founder of the Electronic Frontier Foundation, the First Amendment advocacy group, in a message to his followers. “You are the troops.” WikiLeaks admiringly forwarded the post to 300,000 of its own followers. As the U.S. and other governments attempted to close down WikiLeaks over the past week, those “troops” have fought back. And so far, it doesn’t look like much of a contest. (Read TIME’s interview with Julian Assange.)

First, the U.S. government pushed WikiLeaks off the servers of Amazon, its U.S. host — thanks in part to an effort by the office of Senator Joe Lieberman, who heads the Senate Homeland Security Committee. After the rogue site was pushed off a smaller, backup host in the U.S., it moved first to a Swiss domain, then to a simple numeric one. WikiLeaks has complained, and some news outlets have reported, about apparent hacker attacks against the website. The effect of all that pressure, however, was very much like cutting the head off the mythical Hydra. By Tuesday evening, WikiLeaks listed 507 Web addresses that it said were hosting the site worldwide.

Read more: http://www.time.com/time/nation/article/0,8599,2035817,00.html#ixzz17aGwioUM

Wikileaks: The World Will Be A Better Place

LONDON -WikiLeaks struggled to stay online Friday as corporations and governments moved to cut its access to the Internet, a potentially crippling blow for an organization dedicated to releasing secret information via the web.
Legal pressure increased on the site’s founder, Julian Assange, after Swedish authorities cleared an obstacle to his arrest by adding information to a European arrest warrant in response to procedural questions from British officials, who had put his possible arrest on hold for more than a day.
Assange’s lawyer said that he is in the U.K. but she hadn’t received a warrant by Friday afternoon.
Assange said that his arrest would do nothing to halt the flow of American diplomatic cables being released by his group and newspapers in several countries. Hundreds have been published in redacted form this week and Assange said that all of the cables had already been distributed in a heavily encrypted form to tens of thousands of people.
If something happened to him, he suggested, then the password needed to unencrypt the data would be released and all the secrets would go out at once.
“History will win,” Assange said in a web chat with readers of The Guardian newspaper, one of the media organizations helping to coordinate the documents’ publication. “The world will be elevated to a better place. Will we survive? That depends on you.”